Sri Lanka’s Most Impressive Bird Watching Sites

From October to early May, Sri Lanka is a great birding destination. Spectacular migrants and endemic species can be admired in the continental island that is situated in the southern end of India. The tropical climate, the arid zones, the intermediate zones, the dry zones and the specific vegetation make good habitats for various bird species.

Sri Lanka has over 430 bird species that can be admired in various locations throughout the country. From the 430 bird species, about 230 are permanent residents (20 species are endemic to the country), about 100 are migrants who visit the country regularly and the rest of the bird species are vagrants and occasional visitors.

The birdwatching sites in Sri Lanka are truly spectacular and any birder visiting the country should stop at Sinharaja Forest Reserve, Horton Plains National Park, Uda Walawe National Park and Bundala National Park.

Birding In Sinharaja Forest Reserve, Sri Lanka

Birding In Sinharaja Forest Reserve, Sri Lanka

Designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1988, Sinharaja Forest Reserve shelters many bird species including 19 of the 20 endemic Sri Lanka bird species.

If you plan to visit Sinharaja Forest Reserve you will most likely see: Sri Lanka Junglefowl, Sri Lanka Spurfowl, Sri Lanka Wood Pigeon, Layard’s Parakeet, Sri Lanka Hanging Parrot, Red-faced Malkoha, Chestnut-backed Owlet, Sri Lanka Grey Hornbill, Green-billed Coucal, Yellow-fronted Barbet, Black-crested Bulbul, Crimson-fronted Barbet, Spot-winged Thrush, Orange-billed Babbler Brown-capped Babbler, Ashy-headed Laughing-Thrush, Legge’s Flowerpecker, Sri Lanka White-eye Sri Lanka Blue Magpie, White-faced Starling Sturnus senex, Sri Lanka Myna, Black-throated Munia, Malabar Trogon, Black Bulbul, Dark-fronted Babbler, Indian Scimitar Babbler, Greater Raquet-tailed Drongo, Ceylon Frogmouth, Crested Honey Buzzard, Crested Goshawk, Shikra, Black Eagle, Rufous-bellied Hawk-Eagle, Mountain Hawk-Eagle, Green Imperial Pigeon and Crested Serpent Eagle.

Birding In Horton Plains National Park, Sri Lanka

Birding In Horton Plains National Park, Sri Lanka

This protected area situated in the central highlands of Sri Lanka is home to 24 mammal species, 9 reptile species, 8 amphibian species and 87 bird species.

Horton Plains National Park is part of the Important Bird Areas of Sri Lanka and it is another place where birders can admire endemic species.

If you plan to visit Horton Plains National Park you will most likely see: Sri Lanka Blue Magpie, Dull-blue Flycatcher, Sri Lanka White-Eye, Sri Lanka Wood Pigeon, Sri Lanka Spurfowl, Sri Lanka Junglefowl, Yellow-fronted Barbet, Orange-billed babbler, Sri Lanka Bush Warbler, Sri Lanka Whistling-thrush, Swiftlets, Alpine Swift, Crested Serpent Eagle, Mountain Hawk-eagle, Black-winged Kite and Peregrine Falcon.

Birding In Uda Walawe National Parks, Sri Lanka

Birding In Uda Walawe National Parks, Sri Lanka

This wildlife sanctuary is situated in a dry zone area and it is a place where tourists can see elephants, endemic bird species, rare migrant bird species, birds of prey and water birds.

If you plan to visit Uda Walawe National Parks you will most likely see: Sri Lanka Spurfowl, Red-faced Malkoha, Sri Lanka Grey Hornbill, Sri Lanka Junglefowl, Brown-capped Babbler, White Wagtail, Black-capped Kingfisher, Cormorants, Painted Stork, Black-headed Ibis, Spot-billed Pelican, Asian Openbill, White-bellied Sea Eagle, Crested Serpent-eagle, Changeable Hawk-eagle, Grey-headed Fish Eagle, Booted Eagle, Indian Roller, Indian Peafowl, Pied Cuckoo and Malabar Pied Hornbill.

Birding In Bundala National Park, Sri Lanka

Birding In Bundala National Park, Sri Lanka

Bundala National Park is a unique area where land, sea and wetlands meet to shelter 32 species of mammals and a diverse bird life with approximately 197 species.

If you plan to visit Bundala National Park you will most likely see: Flamingo, Waterfowl Little Cormorants, Indian Cormorants, Grey Heron, Black-headed Ibis, Eurasian Spoonbill, Asian Openbill, Painted Stork, Medium Sized Waders, Small Waders, Black-necked Stork, Common Redshank, Marsh Sandpiper, Yellow-wattled Lapwing, Common Greenshank, Curlew Sandpiper, Ruff, Pintail Snipe, Red-wattled Lapwing, Little Stint, Cattle Egret, Little Egret, Median Egret, Large Egret, Gull-billed Tern, Caspian Tern, Large-Crested Tern, Lesser-Crested Tern, Little Tern and Eurasian Coot.

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Author: Boris

I love to travel and explore new places around the world. Meeting different people from various intercultural background and spending time with locals is something that makes me feel great. You can connect with me at Google+ or follow me on Twitter.

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